Sex Tape

The previews for Sex Tape mentioned "the cloud" so often (and so cluelessly) that everyone immediately recognized that this movie would be very dated very quickly. But even without the technological references Sex Tape was destined to be anchored to the time it was made. Movies about sex always are.

Sex Tape is about a married couple who use their new ipad to film themselves going through all the positions in the Joy of Sex. The next day they are appalled when they find out the video has leaked to their friends and neighbors. Thankfully, once the plot starts rolling all of the "oh noes! technology!" stuff fades into the background a bit: it's merely the first marble that starts the plot's Rube Goldberg Machine machine in motion. All of the stuff in the middle is classic farce stuff, like Cameron Diaz having to stall her boss while her husband is in the other room fighting off a guard dog that doesn't like him snooping around.

What doesn't fade into the background is that the reason why this couple made their sex tape: they wanted to retreat back into their hedonistic youth when they had sex constantly because they are tired of being the middle aged people they have somehow become. And that's the thing that I think is really going to date this movie: I don't know how our culture will define "maturity" in twenty or thirty years, but I really doubt that the current standard is going to stay in place.

 The Rob Lowe character in this movie is obsessed with having his face painted into Disney movies. The movie offers no explanation for why he does this, but I'd like to think that it's because he's secretly torn about being an adult, too.

The Rob Lowe character in this movie is obsessed with having his face painted into Disney movies. The movie offers no explanation for why he does this, but I'd like to think that it's because he's secretly torn about being an adult, too.

Every few weeks I'll see an article about how millennials are redefining "maturity". Your opinion on this topic probably hinges on whether you think that people should just accept that life is an endless parade of shitty responsibilities but you've got to suck it up and soldier on, or whether you think that people should do what makes them the happiest, even if that means ducking a fair amount of responsibility. When you look at the core neurosis that Sex Tape is exploring - and sex farces almost always explore a cultural neurosis - you see that it's really a movie about people trying to figure out if they were right to try to have a meaningful life (where they give all of their time and energy to their kids) or if they should have continued to have a happy life (where they got to spend all their time and energy on themselves.) I'm not sure that was a reasonable question fifty years ago, and I'm not sure that it will be a reasonable question fifty years from now. It's a very 2014 problem to have.

The answer in Sex Tape is fairly conservative, of course: they realize that they love their family and they hate the petty vanities that led them to make their sex tape. But then again, the people who made this movie aren't millienials - they're significantly older. The sex comedies that are made by this up-and-coming generation are likely to be a lot different. Who knows? These out of control kids might end up going whole-hog on a no-responsibility, all-fun ethos, as the old fogeys seem to fear. It could be that Sex Tape 2044 will be about a married couple who are mad that their neighbors refuse to watch their graphic home movies, or it could be about a world where sex tapes don't exist because all sex acts are done in the street in broad daylight.

Or maybe it'll just be about "the cloud". That's a thing that the future is sure to have, right?

Winner: Me

Sex Tape on IMDB